Available Interviews in Alphabetical Order

83 interviews (and growing) with a wide range of contemporary authors, available in their entirety online.

NPR Interviews BLACK MOUNTAIN LETTERS’ Jonathan Creasy - Originally broadcast on October 21, 2016, Rachel Monroe sits down with Dublin-based author, musician, publisher, educator, public speaker, and broadcaster, Jonathan Creasy. The main topic of discussion is Creasy’s latest work, in which he highlights the renowned artists and instructors at Black Mountain College, one of Read on! →
A Conversation with Jovanka Živanović -  A Conversation with Jovanka Živanović by Jovanka Kalaba Fragile Travelers is now available for purchase. How do you see your book “Putnici od stakla” (“Fragile Travelers”)? What impulse drove you to write it? It’s a story about longing for beauty Read on! →
Tom O’Neill (GRATTAN AND ME) interviewed on RTE Radio - Dalkey author, Tom O’Neill, was interviewed about his novel, GRATTAN AND ME, on ARENA at RTE Radio on February 21st. You can listen to the archived program online here, beginning at the 21-minute mark.
Interview with Christopher Woodall - The following interview was placed in the advance galleys of NOVEMBER, by Christopher Woodall. Why choose fourteen working-class men in France during the 1970s as the subject matter for your novel? What in particular attracted you to that setting and Read on! →
A Conversation with Kathy Acker By Ellen G. Friedman - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1989, Volume 9.3 ELLEN G. FRIEDMAN: I’d like to begin with your novel Don Quixote. The epigraph to Part II of Don Quixote reads, “Being dead, Don Quixote could no longer speak. Being Read on! →
A Conversation with Svetlana Alexievich By Ana Lucic - ANA LUCIC: Voices from Chernobyl is a startling, emotional book. What is the main emotion or effect you were trying to achieve with its readers? SVETLANA ALEXIEVICH: There is an opinion, after so many years, that we know everything there Read on! →
A Conversation with Felipe Alfau By Ilan Stavans - From the “Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Spring 1993, Volume 13.1 “A man’s life is like those geographical fragments with which children learn ‘the contiguous countries.’ The pieces are a puzzle; but put them together carefully, and lo! They are a Read on! →
A Conversation with Svetislav Basara By Ana Lucic - ANA LUCIC: What are the origins of Chinese Letter? SVETISLAV BASARA: Chinese Letter is my first novel, and it originated from the need to write a novel. Until that time I was writing stories and I felt that I had Read on! →
A Conversation with Mark Binelli - A first-generation American, Mark Binelli grew up just outside of Detroit, where he worked in his father’s knife-sharpening shop. He graduated from the University of Michigan and received an MFA from Columbia University. Currently, he is a contributing editor at Read on! →
A Conversation with Andrei Bitov By Dmitry Bavilsky - DMITRY BAVILSKY: What are you currently working on? ANDREI BITOV: Once, during a phone conversation, I came up with a good answer for this question—on myself. Actually I have been trying to combine my own projects with those assigned to Read on! →
A Conversation with Roger Boylan By Eamonn Wall - Eamonn Wall: From what I have gathered your were born in the US, but were raised in Ireland. Could you provide some background on this? Roger Boylan: I was indeed born in the US but grew up in Europe, not Read on! →
A Conversation with Christine Brooke-Rose By Ellen G. Friedman and Miriam Fuchs - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1989, Vol. 9.3 Q: In your essay “Ill Iterations,” which you wrote for “Breaking the Sequence: Women’s Experimental Fiction,” you mention the difficulties experimental writers face when they are male, but you say Read on! →
A Conversation with Chandler Brossard By Steven Moore - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Spring 1987, Vol. 7.1 The following is an edited transcript of two talks we recorded during the summer of 1985 at Mr. Brossard’s apartment in New York City. Review of Contemporary Fiction: You began Read on! →
A Conversation with Alan Burns By David W. Madden - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1997, Vol. 17.2 This interview was conducted entirely through the mail from May to September 1994. As I finished rereading each of his eight novels, I would send a group of questions to Read on! →
A Conversation with William Burroughs By Philippe Mikriammos - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Spring 1984, Vol. 4.1 What follows, being now nearly ten years old, is a document, not unprecedented material that will shed new light on William S. Burroughs. In any case, William Burroughs has pushed Read on! →
A Conversation with Michel Butor By Anna Otten - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1985, Vol. 5.3 ANNA OTTEN: What makes you write a new book? MICHEL BUTOR: I like to explore, everything interests me. Within each book I explore something new, see various perspectives, consider certain Read on! →
A Conversation with Angela Carter By Anna Katsavos - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1994, Vol. 14.3 Crammed in with all the other gear packed for a ski trip was my copy of Angela Carter’s newest novel, Wise Children. Because sheer exhaustion made it difficult for me Read on! →
A Conversation with Jerome Charyn By Frederic Tuten - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1992, Vol. 12.2 FT: Let’s begin this way: you’re a writer of-how many novels? JC: Twenty-two. FT: But before your “bande dessinee,” The Magician’s Wife, you had written about nineteen “straight“novels. How did Read on! →
A Conversation with S.D. Chrostowska, author of “Permission” - Cailin Neal: Silence and solidarity in Permission challenge the normal conceptions of silence as loneliness or empty space. Silence can be used as punishment, can deem someone an outcast, and can provide spiritual comfort. Writing is a very solitary and silent Read on! →
An interview with Joshua Cohen by Shir Alon - Q. We’re anticipating that the publication of this book—a large, sprawling novel written in language that would seem at home among modern and late-modern greats like Joyce or Gaddis—will raise some real questions about our contemporary literary expectations. Some readers Read on! →
A Conversation with Julio Cortazar By Evelyn Picon Garfield - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1983, Vol. 3.3 EPG:Let’s begin with some general questions. How would you characterize your writing within the context of a literary generation in Argentina and in Latin America? JC: The question is somewhat Read on! →
A Conversation with Robert Creeley By Bruce Comens - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1995, Vol. 15.3 I interviewed Robert Creeley in early January 1993 at his home in Buffalo, New York. I’d been reading and rereading his fiction while in residence at the Millay Colony and Read on! →
A Conversation with Susan Daitch By Larry McCaffery - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1993, Vol. 13.2 LARRY MCCAFFERY: What sort of writing have you been doing recently? In an interview a while back you mentioned you were working on a series of interrelated novellas . . Read on! →
A Conversation with Fernando del Paso By Ilan Stavans - ILAN STAVANS: Since in “Palinuro of Mexico” you function not only as the novel’s author but also as a cultural commentator, I wonder if you could take a step back for a moment and assess for me its merit and Read on! →
A Conversation with Fernando del Paso By Ilan Stavans - ILAN STAVANS: Since in “Palinuro of Mexico” you function not only as the novel’s author but also as a cultural commentator, I wonder if you could take a step back for a moment and assess for me its merit and Read on! →
A Conversation with Samuel Delany By K. Leslie Steiner - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1996, Vol. 16.3 K. LESLIE STEINER: Recently you’ve discouraged personal interviews, urging those who would interview you to write out their questions; and you respond in writing. Your recent book, Silent Interviews, is Read on! →
A Conversation with Jose Donoso By Ricardo Gutierrez Mouat - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1992, Vol. 12.2 The following conversation with Jose Donoso was held at the writer’s house in Santiago in November of 1990, when the Chilean spring was blossoming in the gardens of the barrio Read on! →
A Conversation with Coleman Dowell By John O’Brien - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1982, Vol. 2.3 This interview was conducted in the spring of 1978 in New York City, and later edited and expanded through correspondence. JOHN O’BRIEN: Is it difficult for you to talk about Read on! →
A Conversation with Rikki Ducornet By Sinda Gregory and Larry McCaffery - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1998, Vol. 18.3 SINDA GREGORY: What kinds of books did you read when you were a kid? RIKKI DUCORNET: One of my favorite books was Heinrich Van Loon’s Ancient Man, filled with his Read on! →
A Conversation with William Eastlake By John O’Brien - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Spring 1983, Vol. 3.1 WE: You asked in your letter who influenced me. JOB: “Influence” is perhaps a bad word because it smacks of imitation. WE: Whom I admire, then. Stephen Crane, Mark Twain Read on! →
A Conversation with Stanley Elkin By Peter J. Bailey - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1995, Vol. 15.2 When I visited Stanley Elkin at his University City, Missouri, home in the fall of 1992, he was in the process of reading galleys for his then-forthcoming book, “Van Gogh’s Read on! →
A Conversation with Carlos Fuentes By Debra A. Castillo - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1988, Vol. 8.2 DEBRA CASTILLO: All the critics that have spoken about your work have noted its diversity of style and genre. In Distant Relations, one of the characters says, “The art of Read on! →
A Conversation with William Gaddis By John Kuehl and Steven Moore - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1982, Vol. 2.2 When William Gaddis agreed to let us interview him, he elected the format favored by Vladimir Nabokov of written questions and answers. He also requested that the interview be “fairly Read on! →
A Conversation with William H. Gass By Arthur M. Saltzman - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1991, Vol. 11.3 ARTHUR M. SALTZMAN: I want to begin by asking you about Salman Rushdie. I am specifically interested in how his plight may correlate to some of the things you say Read on! →
A Conversation with Zulfikar Ghose By Reed Way Dasenbrock and Feroza Jussawalla - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1989, Vol. 9.2 THIS CONVERSATION TOOK PLACE 16 July 1985, at Zulfikar Ghose’s house in Austin, Texas. Ghose lives in the beginnings of the hill country, just west of Austin, in a verdant Read on! →
A Conversation with Georgi Gospodinov By Ana Lucic - ANA LUCIC: When did Natural Novel first appear in Bulgaria, and were you pleased by the reception it got? Do you think critics understood the novel? GEORGI GOSPODINOV: Natural Novel came out first at the end of 1999, after winning Read on! →
A Conversation with Juan Goytisolo By Julio Ortega, trans. Joseph Schraibman - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1984, Vol. 4.2 Julio Ortega: The main character in your novel entitled Marks of Identity is a Spaniard alienated from his milieu. In Count Julian, your new novel, alienation is even more radical: Read on! →
A Conversation with Alasdair Gray By Mark Axelrod - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1995, Vol. 15.2 MARK AXELROD: You are most widely known for the richly imaginative and what Robert Crawford called “labyrinthine” novel Lanark: A Life in Four Books, a novel that is as stunning Read on! →
A Conversation with John Hawkes By Patrick O’Donnell - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1983, Vol. 3.3 What follows is an edited transcript of several conversations that I conducted with John Hawkes at Brown University on June 25, 26, and 27, 1979. These conversations were recorded in Read on! →
A Conversation with G. Cabrera Infante By Marie-Lise Gazarian Gautier - Guillermo Cabrera Infante was born in Gíbara, in the Province of Oriente, Cuba, in 1929. One of the best-known writers of the “Boom,” his name nevertheless does not appear in the 1980 Dictionary of Cuban Literature, published by the Institute Read on! →
A Conversation with Danilo Kis By Brendan Lemon - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Spring 1994, Vol. 14.1 I met Danilo Kis for the first time at his Paris apartment on the day of our interview—a cool, overcast afternoon in May 1984. Kis hadn’t been part of my Read on! →
A Conversation with Anita Konkka By Ana Lucic - ANA LUCIC: Could you tell us something of the origins of In the Fool’s Paradise? ANITA KONKKA: The name of the book came first—usually it’s just the opposite: the name comes last. “Alexander” (the hero and “muse” of the story) Read on! →
A Conversation with Tadeusz Konwicki By Dorota Sobieska - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1994, Vol. 14.3 DOROTA SOBIESKA: I have plenty of questions but prefer this to be more of a conversation. TADEUSZ KONWICKI: Yes, but I have something to start with, and the best questions Read on! →
A Conversation with Menis Koumandareas By Ana Lucic - ANA LUCIC: Could you tell us something about the circumstances that inspired the novel Koula? MENIS KOUMANDAREAS: I remember the endless comings and goings on that old train very clearly—the train linking the northern Athenian suburbs with the port of Read on! →
A Conversation with Alex Kovacs, author of “The Currency of Paper” - Cailin Neal: You live in London and your book is set in London. An obvious question, but why London for your book? Alex Kovacs: I’ve actually been away from London for a year, but am hoping to soon return. It Read on! →
A Conversation with Milan Kundera By Lois Oppenheim - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1989, Vol. 9.2 I came to what was to be the first of several meetings with Milan Kundera eager to confirm that the great popularity of one of Europe’s most important novelists was Read on! →
A Conversation with Osman Lins By Edla Van Steen (Translated by Adria Frizzi) - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1995, Vol. 15.3 By Edla Van Steen, Translated by Adria Frizzi (the quote from Avalovara is from Gregory Rabassa’s trans.) Osman Lins died on 8 July 1978 without having been able to answer Read on! →
A Conversation with Ron Loewinsohn By Corey Weber - Note: This interview was conducted via e-mail in Summer 2002, prior to the Dalkey reprint of Ron Loewinsohn’s Magnetic Field(s) in November of the same year. CW: When Magnetic Field(s) was first published in 1983, there really weren’t many books Read on! →
A Conversation with Wallace Markfield By John O’Brien - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Spring 1982, Vol. 2.1 This interview was conducted in the spring of 1978 at Mr. Markfield’s home in Port Washington, New York. JOB: Where do we begin? WM: Ask the questions. If I don’t Read on! →
A Conversation with David Markson By Joseph Tabbi - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1990, Vol. 10.2 JOSEPH TABBI: People find it interesting that you were friendly with several major writers when you were quite young, long before you had written anything yourself. DAVID MARKSON: Oh, well, Read on! →
A Conversation with Carole Maso By Stephen Moore - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1997, Vol. 17.3 STEVEN MOORE: You’ve been called an “experimental” writer; while innovation is valued, even insisted on in the other arts (painting, dancing, music), innovation in literature seems to meet with resistance. Read on! →
A Conversation with Harry Mathews By John Ash - Part 1 JOHN ASH: I’ve always thought there was an affinity between the opening of Firbank’s “Vainglory” and the opening of “Tlooth.” This is “Vainglory”: “And then, oh yes! Atlanta is getting too pronounced.” She spoke lightly, leaning back a Read on! →
A Conversation with Harry Mathews By John Ashbery - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1987, Vol. 7.3 John Ashbery: One is supposed to ask questions about a writer’s work, but I thought I would ask you about your life, which I know very little about. As so Read on! →
A Conversation with Paul Metcalf By John O’Brien - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1981, Vol. 1.2 Paul Metcalf’s books include Will West (Jonathan Williams 1956), Genoa (Jargon. 1965), Patagoni (Jargon, 1971), Apalache (Turtle Island, 1976), The Middle Passage (Jargon, 1976), Zip Odes (Tansy Press, 1979), and Read on! →
A Conversation with Bradford Morrow By Patrick McGrath - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Spring 2000, Vol. 20.1 PATRICK MCGRATH: Before the novels, there was Conjunctions. How did that come to be? Let’s start there and move wherever we need to move to. BRADFORD MORROW: Conjunctions originally was Read on! →
A Conversation with Nicholas Mosley By John O’Brien - This interview was conducted by mail over a two-year period during 1977 and 1978.   I: Let me give you a quotation from Mallarmé and see whether you think it describes your conception of fiction, though he is speaking about Read on! →
A Conversation with Dorothy Nelson By Ana Lucic - ANA LUCIC: There is a lot of anger and rage in Tar and Feathers. Anger that seems to be primarily directed at the state institutions, government, and marriage. Some would say that this type of outrage has been a general Read on! →
A Conversation with Claude Ollier By Cecile Lindsay - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1988, Vol. 8.2 CECILE LINDSAY: The works of the first cycle of Le Jeu d’enfant adopt the form of popular genres such as the colonial novel, the detective story, or the mystery, while Read on! →
A Conversation with Toby Olson By Douglas Gunn - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1991, Vol. 11.2 Not long after we began talking about this interview, and various possibilities for the shape it might take, Toby Olson and I agreed that we would avoid the conventional, taped Read on! →
A Conversation with Patrik Ouredník By Céline Bourhis - Patrik Ouredník was born in Prague‚ but emigrated to France in 1984‚ where he still lives. He is the author of eight books‚ including fiction‚ essays‚ and poems. He is also the Czech translator of novels‚ short stories‚ and plays Read on! →
A Conversation with Milorad Pavic By Thanassis Lallas - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1998, Vol. 18.2 Milorad means beloved in his language. Milorad Pavic is unknown to many of you. He is a Serbian writer, nominated several times for the Nobel Prize for Literature. According to Read on! →
A Conversation with Richard Powers By Jim Neilson - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1998, Vol. 18.3 Jim Neilson: If it’s all right with you, I thought we could begin by looking at a passage from your first novel, Three Farmers on Their Way to a Dance: Read on! →
A Conversation with Manuel Puig By Jorgelina Corbatta (Translated and adapted by Ilan Stavans) - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1991, Vol. 11.3 This interview with Manuel Puig took place during a weekend in September 1979, after he was part of a Congress of Hispanic-American Writers in Medellin, Colombia. Other participants in the Read on! →
A Conversation with Raymond Queneau By Georges Charbonnier - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1997, Vol. 17.3 GEORGES CHARBONNIER: Raymond Queneau, you said to me one day that two great currents exist in literature and that basically one could, if I understood you correctly, link most novels Read on! →
A Conversation with Ishmael Reed By Reginald Martin - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1984, Vol. 4.2 Ishmael Reed was born February 22, 1933, in Chattanooga, Tennessee. When he was still a child, he and his family moved to Buffalo, New York, where Reed grew up, eventually Read on! →
A Conversation with Julián Ríos By Marie-Lise Gazarian Gautier - Q: Do your readers have to go through a period of initiation to understand your work? A: No, absolutely not, but every reading is gradual. There are various levels or stories in any minimally complex work. I would like my Read on! →
A Conversation with Vedrana Rudan By Ana Lucic - ANA LUCIC: While reading your book, I was reminded of Louis-Ferdinand Celine and Kathy Acker—what writers most influenced you in writing Night? VEDRANA RUDAN: What influences! When I was writing this book I was going through a terrible depression. I Read on! →
A Conversation with Edward Sanders By Brooke Horvath - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Spring 1999, Vol. 19.1 The following conversation was taped on 18 November 1997. Ed was visiting Cleveland to deliver a talk at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as part of its special Read on! →
A Conversation with Edward Sanders By Barry Miles - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Spring 1999, Vol. 19.1 In 1965 I was managing Better Books, an avant-garde bookshop on London’s Charing Cross Road, which stocked as many American small-press poetry magazines as I could get. We carried Lines, Read on! →
A Conversation with Hubert Selby By John O’Brien - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1981, Vol. 1.2 Hubert Selby has published four novels: Last Exit to Brooklyn (Grove Press, 1964), The Room (Grove Press, 1971), The Demon (Playboy, 1976), and Requiem for a Dream (Playboy, 1978). This Read on! →
A Conversation with Hubert Selby By S. E. Gontarski - SEG: Why don’t we begin with your assessment of Grove Press? HS: I’ll be sixty years old this year [1988] so everybody certainly from my generation on is indebted to Barney. It’s hard to believe that it was not so Read on! →
A Conversation with Kazufumi Shiraishi - Me Against the World is essentially a personal journal. Why did you decide to use this unconventional format? When I was writing, I really didn’t have any particular intention in mind, other than to write out my personal thoughts.
A Conversation with Claude Simon By Anthony Cheal Pugh - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Spring 1985, Vol. 5.1 ANTHONY CHEAL PUGH: Claude Simon, a remark you made during our conversations in Dublin a year or so ago particularly interested me. You said that you did not consider that Read on! →
A Conversation with Josef Skvorecky By Sam Solecki - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Spring 1997, Vol. 17.1 SAM SOLECKI: “The Bride of Texas” appeared in Czech two years ago and in English last year. Could you tell me something about it? JOSEF SKVORECKY: It’s a historical novel, Read on! →
A Conversation with Gilbert Sorrentino By John O’Brien - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction” John O’Brien: Has William Carlos Williams influenced your fiction? Gilbert Sorrentino: In general, my fiction has been influenced by the prose of Williams. My prose, I think, has been more influenced by verse than Read on! →
A Conversation with Alexander Theroux By Steven Moore - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Spring 1991, Vol. 11.1 STEVEN MOORE: Did your years as a religious prepare you in any way for the literary life? What parallels are there in the devotion inherent in both callings? Is the Read on! →
A Conversation with Eloy Urroz By Theodore L. McDermott - Theodore McDermott: The Obstacles is, in a lot of ways, a coming-of-age story, but it’s also an incredibly ambitious—and achieved—book. How old were you when you wrote it? Eloy Urroz: I started The Obstacles after finishing Las leyes que el Read on! →
A Conversation with Luisa Valenzuela By Evelyn Picon Garfield - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1986, Vol. 6.3 EVELYN PICON GARFIELD: Let’s talk a little about “The Lizard’s Tail.” To what extent is the depiction of the Sorcerer based on the historical figure of Jose Lopez Rega? Wasn’t Read on! →
A Conversation with William T Vollmann By Larry McCaffery - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1993, Vol. 13.2 Larry McCaffery: In one of your biographical statements, you emphasize your absorption as a kid in books—this sense of riding on the magic carpet with the caliph, and so on. Read on! →
A Conversation with David Foster Wallace By Larry McCaffery - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Summer 1993, Vol. 13.2 LARRY McCAFFERY: Your essay following this interview is going to be seen by some people as being basically an apology for television. What’s your response to the familiar criticism that Read on! →
A Conversation with Paul West By David W. Madden - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Spring 1991, Vol. 11.1 The following interview was conducted in the front room of Paul West’s home in Ithaca, New York, 15-17 June 1989. The discussion was memorable for many reasons, not least of Read on! →
A Conversation with Edmond White By Edmond White - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 1996, Vol. 16.3 In 1994, when Edmund White was asked to do an interview for this issue, he decided instead to interview himself. Q: Could you describe your early unpublished novels? A: But Read on! →
A Conversation with Edmond White By Gene Hayworth - Gene Hayworth: In the introduction to A Star-Bright Lie, you mentioned that you and Coleman Dowell became friends after your review of Island People. Do you remember the circumstances of your first meeting? Edmund White: I had reviewed Dowell for Read on! →
A Conversation with Curtis White By Heather Freese - Heather Freese: This novel does not follow a direct linear path—how do you see the structure of “Memories of My Father Watching TV“? Curtis White: This book, like my last few books, does not have a linear plot-oriented structure, but Read on! →
A Conversation with Curtis White By Chad Post - Chad Post: How would you describe Requiem? Curtis White: Like any requiem, my requiem is a meditation on death. It is a meditation in the old-fashioned sense of a consideration of human impermanence and mutability, but it’s also a meditation Read on! →
A Conversation with Diane Williams By John O’Brien - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Fall 2003, Vol. 23.3 John O’Brien: Why are you moving to New York? Diane Williams: A lot of different reasons. JOB: Professional? DW: Well, they’re all professional, all my reasons. For scope. And I Read on! →
A Conversation with Marguerite Young By Ellen G. Friedman and Miriam Fuchs - From “The Review of Contemporary Fiction,” Spring 2003, Vol. 23.1 I: You have been writing for more than half a century. Although your two books of poetry “Prismatic Ground” and “Moderate Fable” were published a few years apart, there were Read on! →
A Conversation Zoran Zivkovic with By Ana Lucic - Winner of the 2003 World Fantasy Award for his novella The Library, Zoran Zivkovic is one of the most highly—regarded writers of genre fiction today, defying narrow categorization and extending the boundaries of the various traditions—science—fiction, fantasy, mystery, noir—he borrows Read on! →

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