Re-Reading David Markson’s ‘Wittgenstein’s Mistress’

Context N°24 Revisiting David Foster Wallace Philip Coleman First published in 1988—after fifty-four rejections, famously—and described by David Foster Wallace, in 1999, as one of the five most “direly underappreciated US novels >1960”—David Markson’s Wittgenstein’s Mistress has, for all that, Read on! →

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Vol. X, #2 John Barth / David Markson

John Barth, “Excerpts from The Last Voyage of Somebody the Sailor: a novel in progress” John Barth, “The Spanish Connection” Ilan Stavans, “The Latin American Connection” Lee Lemon, “John Barth and the Common Reader” Steven Weisenburger, “Barth and Black Humor” Read on! →

Critical Conditions

Context N°12 by Daniel Green I.The Educated General Reader Among the lighter casualties of the great Internet crash must be counted the possibility of a cyber-based style of literary criticism offered up initially by such web publications as Salon, Slate, Read on! →

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Wittgenstein’s Mistress

Wittgenstein’s Mistress is a novel unlike anything David Markson—or anyone else—has ever written before. It is the story of a woman who is convinced—and, astonishingly, will ultimately convince the reader as well—that she is… Read on! →

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Wittgenstein’s Mistress

Wittgenstein’s Mistress is a novel unlike anything David Markson—or anyone else—has ever written before. It is the story of a woman who is convinced—and, astonishingly, will ultimately convince the reader as well—that she is… Read on! →

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This Is Not a Tragedy

The very first book-length study to focus on this seminal American author, This Is Not a Tragedy reviews David Markson’s entire body of work . . . Read on! →

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Springer’s Progress

Here comes Lucien Springer. Age: forty-seven. Still handsome though muchly vodka’d novelist, currently abashed by acute creative dysfunction. Sole preoccupation amid these artistic doldrums: pursuit of fair women. Springer is a randy incorrigible who… Read on! →

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Reader’s Block

In this spellbinding, utterly unconventional fiction, an aging author who is identified only as Reader contemplates the writing of a novel. As he does, other matters insistently crowd his mind—literary and cultural anecdotes, endless quotations… Read on! →